Fundraiser for SNAP in San Francisco

Author: Melanie Jula Sakoda
Date Published: 05/16/2016
Publication: Pokrov.org

Friends for Benefits Presents: An Evening with Bobcat Goldthwait, A Benefit for SNAP.

Come out to the Roxie Theater in San Francisco (3117 16th Street) on May 27th at 7 pm for an exclusive screening of Call Me Lucky with visionary director Bobcat Goldthwait (World’s Greatest Dad, God Bless America).

Afterward, please join us for a Q&A moderated by Silvia Turchin, and for premium ticket holders, get an autograph at our meet and greet.

A portion of the proceeds from this evening will go to SNAP, Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests (snapnetwork.org), as well as Friends for Benefits (friendsforbenefits.org).

Tickets are available here.

“Call Me Lucky is the inspiring, triumphant and wickedly funny portrait of one of comedy’s most enigmatic and important figures: Barry Crimmins. The beer-swilling, politically outspoken and whip-smart comic whose efforts in the 70s and 80s fostered the talents of the next generation of standup comedians. But beneath Crimmins’ gruff, hard-drinking, curmudgeonly persona lay an undercurrent of rage stemming from his long-suppressed and horrific abuse as a child – a rage that eventually found its way out of the comedy clubs and television shows and into the political arena.” –callmeluckymovie.com.

Bobcat Goldthwait has written and directed a number of films and television series, most notably the black comedies Shakes the Clown (1991), which he also starred in, Sleeping Dogs Lie (2006), World’s Greatest Dad (2009), God Bless America (2011), and the horror film Willow Creek (2013); episodes of Chappelle’s Show (2003), Jimmy Kimmel Live! (2004–07), and Maron (2013–15); and several stand-up specials, including Patton Oswalt: Tragedy Plus Comedy Equals Time (2014).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobcat_Goldthwait

Silvia Turchin is a Bay Area-based documentary filmmaker. Her work explores memory and nostalgia, often amidst urban landscapes, and seeks to gain intimacy with the past through keen visual and aural observation of the traces it has left in our current day-to-day surroundings. Silvia is Assistant Professor of Cinematic Arts at California State University Monterey Bay and has also taught film production at UC Berkeley, San Francisco State University, and the San Francisco Art Institute. Her films have screened at festivals and venues such as Ann Arbor Film Festival, Big Sky Documentary Film Festival, Pacific Film Archive, Filmfest Dresden, Mill Valley Film Festival, Frameline, and the Sebastopol Documentary Film Festival.